Introducing Poetry Club

Seniors+Taber+Hersum+and+Maesy+Edmonstone+write+their+own+poems+at+the+Dec.+2+Poetry+Club+meeting.+
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Introducing Poetry Club

Seniors Taber Hersum and Maesy Edmonstone write their own poems at the Dec. 2 Poetry Club meeting.

Seniors Taber Hersum and Maesy Edmonstone write their own poems at the Dec. 2 Poetry Club meeting.

Jacob Maguire

Seniors Taber Hersum and Maesy Edmonstone write their own poems at the Dec. 2 Poetry Club meeting.

Jacob Maguire

Jacob Maguire

Seniors Taber Hersum and Maesy Edmonstone write their own poems at the Dec. 2 Poetry Club meeting.

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On a bleak Tuesday afternoon in December, laughter, loud voices, and applause erupt from Rm. 310. The noise shatters the silence of the English hallway after school.

Inside the classroom, Poetry Club meets. During the meetings, students listen to spoken word poetry and write poems both in groups and individually. They also have the opportunity to share their original poems aloud.

Senior Tatianna Noriega created the club in November as her senior project. Even so, Noriega is extremely enthusiastic about the subject matter.

“I started this club to focus on all types of poetry, but especially spoken word poetry,” Noriega said. “I feel like spoken word poetry can connect us all.” Noriega also encourages shy students who like poetry, but may not enjoy reading aloud, to join.

“I like reading poetry aloud, especially, because I struggle with something that I like to call verbal dyslexia, where I struggle to come up with the right words,” she said. “Spoken word poetry doesn’t need to have a structure. It can be fragmented.”

According to Noriega, spoken word poetry is also “open to all shapes and forms.” It doesn’t have to be serious or meaningful, she said. Instead, “it can be funny or meaningless.”

Also referred to as “slam” poetry, spoken word poetry is utilized in a variety of methods and mediums, frequently to get people interested or engaged in different aspects of life. For example, orators use it to capture the attention of urban school audiences and encourage them to make the most of their formative years.

Freshman James Rogers joined the club to explore his passion for poetry. “I joined this club because I really enjoy writing poetry,” he said. “I’ll be back next week.”

Sophomore Chyna Dougherty came to a club meeting because she wanted to try something new. She said, “I heard about Poetry Club and I decided, hey, why not?”

Ms. Christina Lawrence, an English teacher, advises the club. This year, Lawrence teaches American Literature, Creative Writing, and English I.

Poetry Club meets every Tuesday in Rm. 310 from 2 to 3 p.m. On Nov. 17, the date of the club’s first meeting, only one student showed up. By Dec. 2, however, its membership had expanded to a group of four seniors, four sophomores, and two freshmen.

Noriega plans to hold meetings all year, culminating with a spoken poetry night in the auditorium. Additionally, she hopes that the club will continue after she graduates this June, but its future depends on the number of students who are interested.

“Everybody should join Poetry Club,” Lawrence said. “The more people, the better.”

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